Taihape Area School

 

USING MĀORI IN THE HOME

Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori has produced a series of booklets about 'Using Māori in the home'. If the Māori language is to flourish, it is important for us to speak it at home as often as we can, to provide Māori language examples and encouragement to our children.

We all know that to speak Māori can be hard work. But, we can make things easier for our children and ourselves if we make it fun and enjoyable.

What can I do?Where can I start?

The Māori language is a taonga that gives our country its distinct and unique cultural identity. For Māori to thrive as a language of everyday use, we must encourage its use in our homes and communities as much as possible.

Māori was the predominant language in the majority of Māori homes and communities until the 1940s when Māori began moving to the cities. In the 1950s and 1960s, Māori families started using more and more English in the home, and this was influenced by English language education, television and radio.
Throughout the early 1970s, urban Māori groups expressed concern about the survival of the Māori language, and in 1982, Te Kōhanga Reo was set up to encourage the language among Māori infants. Since then, Māori immersion education has expanded into the primary schools and beyond, to kura kaupapa Māori and immersion programmes.

Māori broadcasting has taken off and a number of initiatives are underway to promote our language such as the national network of more than 20 iwi radio stations and the development of a new Māori television channel.

Māori was once a vibrant and living language that was spoken in the home, and within the wider community. It is possible for the Māori language to again become a vibrant, living language but that requires the effort of all of us.

The 1995 Māori language survey showed that nearly 60 per cent of all Māori adults had some ability to speak Māori. However, there is a very wide range of language ability among these people, and most are at the lower end of the fluency range.

Make a start by using whatever Māori language skills you have with your children, other members of your family, and friends. Speaking Māori is not an all-or-nothing affair, and any use of the language will help your family develop their Māori language skills.

You can also extend your knowledge of the language, by learning and using as few as two new words a day. You will have learned over 700 words and phrases in a year!

Remember, young children need lots of repetition when they are learning a language. If you are using the Māori language, this can give you the opportunity to reinforce what you have learned as well.

Learning a language is a long-term endeavour and takes commitment. But the more you use the language, the easier it becomes. Don't be put off by slow progress at the early stages. Practise, practise, practise is the most successful formula for language learning. You can develop skills in the language and pass on this taonga to your children but it takes energy and commitment.

If you have limited language skills, start out with the basics:

·        Answer the phone and greet others using "kia ora" or "tēnākoe".

·        Label household items with their Māori names. This will also help remind you to kōrero Māori.

·        Keep a list of new words or ones you find difficult to remember on the fridge, or somewhere handy around the house, for easy access.

·        Think of ways to encourage yourself and others in the household to kōrero Māori. Maybe you could put up signs that say "Kōrero Māori"

·        Find someone who is more advanced at speaking Māori than yourself and regularly spend time with them.

·        If you have children at Kōhanga Reo spend time with them there. You will learn too.

·        Learn some simple waiata and nursery rhymes that you can enjoy with your children.

·        Borrow or buy children's books in Māori and read them. Both you and your children will benefit.

·        Practice speaking Māori to your children. They will be learning the language from you as well as providing an uncritical ear.

·        When speaking English, substitute Māori words for common items and expressions. For example, "Don't play with your kai", "Do you want to go to the wharepaku?", "She is hoha with her friend because...", etc.

The first step is the hardest. Once you have taken the plunge, you will find that it becomes easier to use your Māori language skills.

Every family is different
Speak Māori as much as you can and gradually increase your use each day.

Look out for resources to help youlearn and speak Māori

There are Māori language courses at most polytechnics, evening classes at schools or find out about your local Ataarangi branch. Join a kapa haka groupnear you, and go along to your regional and national kapa haka competitions. Some churches hold regular services in Māori. You can ask your local Minister.

Libraries are a good source of books and some have Māori language cassette tapes. You can also buy a range of Māori language books for children published by various companies. Read Māori periodicals such as He Muka, Toi Te Kupu and Pū Kaea, and check past issues of Mana Magazine which also had Māori language articles.

Keep an eye out in your local newspaper for Māori plays, television programmes (such as Te Karere, Marae, Waka Huia and Mai Time), and museum exhibitions. Tune in to your local Māori radio stations, and Māori news bulletins from Mana Māori Media and Ruia Mai.

The Internet is becoming the fastest and easiest way for all to access information. This is also true for Māori and the Māori language as more and more people publish Māori language information on the web. There are Māori dictionaries, free Māori fonts, clip-art, places to start learning Māori and even a course or two.

To replace this placeholder, please upload the original image (C:\Users\RMCMIL~1\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image011.gif) on server and insert it in the document.By reading this you have taken the first step towards introducing more Māori language into your home and life.
Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori wants to support your family's efforts to learn and use the Māori language.
Below is a short list of kupu whānui to help you get started...

 

Counting in Māori

1 tahi

11 tekau mā

30 toru tekau

2 rua

12 tekau mā

40 whā tekau

3 toru

13 tekau mā

50 rima tekau

4 whā

14 tekau mā

60 ono tekau

5 rima

15 tekau mā

70 whitu tekau

6 ono

16 tekau mā

80 waru tekau

7 whitu

17 tekau mā

90 iwa tekau

8 waru

18 tekau mā

100 kotahi rau

9 iwa

19 tekau mā

1000 kotahi mano

10 tekau

20 rua tekau

 

KUPU HOUNew Words

Upoko

Head

Pēke

Bag

Makawe

Hair

Rākau

Tree

Taringa

Ear

Maramataka

Calendar

Whatu

Eye

Tiwhikete

Certificate

Tukemata

Eyebrow

Reo Irirangi

Radio

Ihu

Nose

Pouaka Whakaata

Television

Waha

Mouth

Pikitia

Picture

Paparinga

Cheek

White

Kauae

Jaw

Pango

Black

Korokoro

Throat

Whero

Red

Poho

Chest

Karaka

Orange

Ringaringa

Arm, Hand

Kōwhai

Yellow

Waewae

Foot, Leg

Kākāriki

Green

Puku

Stomach

Kahurangi

Blue

Nono

Buttocks

Parauri

Brown

Pene Rākau

Pencil

Tama

Boy

Pene

Pen

Kōtiro

Girl

Pukapuka

Book

Tangata

Person

Tioka

Chalk

Tāne

Man

Kuaha

Door

Wahine

Woman

Karaka

Clock

Tamaiti

Child

Kai

Food

Rangatahi

Youth

Inu

Drink

Wai

Water

Tūru

Chair

Tēpu

Table, Desk

Rorohiko

Computer